Surviving As A College Grad Isnt Impossible Kenny Soto

Surviving As A College Grad Isn’t Impossible, Right?

“Hard choices, easy life. Easy choices, hard life.” — Jerzy Gregorek

 

What I wish I knew before graduating college

It happens once every year. Parents full of tears and hope for their children; professors, college administrators, faculty, and staff watch as young and hopeful students ascend from their 4-5 year journey from academia into the professional world.

With a promise of new opportunities and fulfilling their dreams and aspirations, graduates look forward to their future adult lives. However, as they are thrusted into the market and entrusted to be responsible young adults – some look to the future with unease. An anxiety creeps in as a realization occurs, “I am no longer a student. I’m an adult now.”

I never self-identified with the term millennial until I graduated college. Being placed into a category that’s often looked down upon didn’t jibe well with me. Now that it has been two years since I’ve graduated, I’ve had more time to think about why so many people my age are suffering from huge amounts of stress and angst.

Having taken the time to discuss the issue of life after college with recent grads, I’ve found that the general sentiment the majority of us feel is, none of us really know what we’re doing when we are starting our careers.

This realization is reassuring only in the fact that we are all going through this struggle together, regardless of the varying degrees of internal strife we may feel. Some get past this hurdle faster than others, some hide their angst better than others, and others try to espouse a nonchalant approach towards their future considering how much time we have to “figure it out.”

I’ve been pursuing some reasonable approach that I could use to tackle the issues at hand, with little luck. I find that trying to create a solid identity, one that really encompasses my passions and allows me to truly have an impact on society, to be utterly difficult to accomplish.

“Advice taken from the past doesn’t always relate to the new and unique challenges that our generation is facing today.”

For seventeen years of my life I have identified as a student. Now that this is no longer the case, I like many of my peers alongside me have to figure out what to is my identity. Moreover, we find ourselves in a position in which, for the most part, we’ve never experienced before.

We have new responsibilities, with no manuals available to help us navigate the new world we are entering. Advice made taken the past doesn’t always relate to the new and unique challenges that our generation is facing today. Both the domestic and global job marketplace is constantly changing. Job security is a thing of the past and yet, for the most part, we have been taught in a way that helps us navigate the markets of the 20th century.

No one will make your schedule for us, there are no handouts, and we all have to assume our own responsibilities. It’s more than just identifying with a profession.

Understanding fully well that a career isn’t built in a day, there still seems to be this unspoken pressure from so many places. Perhaps this pressure I personally feel could be coming from the fact that I’m a first generation American. I’m certain that I’m not the only one who has a unique “chip on their shoulder.” Whether it’s from your parents, social circle, society – the pressure won’t go away. However, the pressure that should take priority is the pressure we give ourselves to succeed and find happiness in a way that we define.

 

Related: 5 Tips To Use When Surviving Life After College

 

Finding a dream job vs. your place in life

It’s easy to settle for the first comfortable job that comes your way during your first six months after graduating. Your parents stress the fact that you need to start contributing to the household. Or if you live on your own, you need to keep maintaining the lifestyle you’re building for yourself. There’s also the added pressure of competing with your friends who have also graduated. “Peter has a new gig as a (insert generic entry level position) at (some prestigious firm)! His prospects are very promising.”

Both the social pressure of trying to seem like you have everything figured out and the balancing act of trying to simply survive and pay off any college debt you may have add to the hasty decision-making for getting the first job that comes your way. That’s what happened to me.

I thought that if I took a job at a startup, I’d at least have something to show for myself. I believed that it was a good starting point as any other and if it didn’t work out I could just move to another company. So that’s what I did.

I moved up the corporate ladder until I got into my dream job, but something didn’t sit well with me. Even with all of the hard work I put into keeping up with appearances and advancing my career I still felt unfulfilled.

I fell into the trap of listening to other people’s expectations they had for me and not designing the expectations I had for myself.

There is no perfect path. There is no reason for you to decide that what you studied in college is what you need to actually do. And going immediately back to school to get a master’s degree or a higher one doesn’t boost the prospect of you getting your “dream job.” It will most certainly guarantee an increase of your debt.

I believe one of the shifts in thinking all us need to adopt is that just because we have college degrees doesn’t mean we are special. What will truly differentiate us in the market is the accumulation of life experiences and the purposeful adoption of struggles and discomfort we make over time. These things aren’t obtained through a college education – that’s why we shouldn’t rush into things.

Sure, with all practicality in mind, we do need to pay our bills. At the same time, need to be very calculated with the opportunities we say no to because it’s the no’s that will create the foundation of our careers.

Our time is the most valuable tool we have right now.

”How can I help people and enjoy my time doing it?” This is the question we should be asking ourselves. It all begins with doing a self-audit of our desires and interests, and it’s not too late to do that even if you’ve already begun working in that lovely cubicle or desk you’ve vied for since leaving the academic world.

A fulfilling career isn’t obtained in a day, it takes a tremendous amount of time.

 

 

Do not confuse cognitive ability with maturity

Keeping the challenge of obtaining our dream jobs, realizing our identity outside of school, and surviving our first decade as adults in mind, there is another shift in our thinking we need to make.

We must not confuse our cognitive ability with maturity. They aren’t the same.

Our educational system coddles us in a way. We expect our time to be managed for us. For things to be clear cut, which doesn’t work with reality. If we can’t break away from the patterns that were predefined for us, how can we create our own in the future?

Maturity is accepting responsibility and choosing our struggles before they are thrusted upon us. However, it is difficult to accept our own responsibilities when we are comparing ourselves to our peers.

Comparing yourself with others can lead to a dead end. If you find yourself jealous or stuck ia n rut because you’re not checking off the boxes – you’re not alone, but you need to stay grounded in reality. It’s impossible to know all the nuances that led to someone else’s success. Envy can be used as a tool to help you succeed, but only if you stay grounded on what success means for you. Just because you received good grades throughout your academic career doesn’t mean you can manage a home on your own. It doesn’t equate to any skills that could be used to help a team grow, it doesn’t ensure that you can be an asset.

Focus on the small things first. Can you create a budget? Do you have the ability to set your own schedule, to say no to the events and opportunities that have nothing to do with your daily goals? Can you set a plan and stick to it? Are you auditing your friends and social circle to make sure you’re being celebrated and supported, instead of being tolerated and doubted?

All of these questions have to be asked frequently if we want to make sure we are staying on track. “Adulting” only occurs when we first define what type of adult we want to be and work our way backwards to where we are today.

 

Related: Creating Your Own Curriculum For Self-Education After College

 

We all go through the growing pains of “adulting”

“Adulting” isn’t impossible. It sure is difficult and arduous, but with enough time spent thinking about our lives – we can tackle our issues with full force. We can achieve our goals, no matter the time it takes to do so. However, it all begins with a realistic view of our futures.

The world is constantly changing. Our education cannot cope nor can it adapt to the changes from technology. It’s up to us to assume responsibility.

We have to create and venture into our paths of self-education. This isn’t the same as getting a higher degree. A master’s degree or PhD won’t solve issues regarding our character.

Travel the world. Volunteer and work for free – see if you actually enjoy working in the field you studied before you invest decades into it. Leverage the internet to not only consume content, use it to help you learn.

You will make mistakes and that’s okay. We all have our own paces when it comes to learning; we all have our unique struggles. What we have to do is assume responsibility for these struggles because it is through them that we will grow up.

Remember, there is no easy path. There is no manual.

 

This blog post was inspired by a podcast episode with Professor Jordan Peterson, when he was interviewed on the Joe Rogan Experience. If you’re a fan of audiobooks or podcasts in general, I highly recommend listening Dr. Peterson’s interview with Joe as accompanying content to this article. In this podcast episode, Dr. Peterson discusses the challenges that young people are currently facing (among other topics). The point of inspiration I gained from the episode comes mainly from his claim that in order to justify your suffering that comes from living in this world, you have to assume responsibility over your life. I wouldn’t do any justice to what he says by paraphrasing him any further, this article is mainly pointed towards the reflections I have made while struggling with life after college.

If you have any tidbits of advice or personal stories you’d like to share, please leave a comment below and let’s chat! How you are “Adulting” right now? How do you define the term?

 

Related: A College Grad’s Biggest “Adulting” Challenge: Managing Money

 

A special thanks to Alejandra Barraza, Rachelle Campos, Kenneth Reed, Matthew Jacquet, Rene Jimenez, Kenny Moreno, and Devin Rajaram for discussing these issues with me and for helping me write this article.

 

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Being Bilingual Kenny Soto

¿Being Bilingual: Navigating The World With Two Identities?

Contemplating my Latino identity while Living in China

I’ve grown up my whole life with the ability to listen to a language that is a part of my very being and with the inability to express myself confidently while using it. I know that Español is a part of my identity, but I sometimes see it as a foreign part of who I am.

I struggle. With dance. With speech. With understanding my heritage.

These struggles have become more pronounced while living in China. Being in a nation where I can’t understand 99.9% of what everyone is saying is the real manifestation of solitude. I am an alien–everyone is far away. Daily reminders of the limitations I currently have here remind me of the ones I have with Español.

When I’m confused, I resort to using si to confirm what I want. And I am still met with confused eyes; I can’t wholly convey my feelings nor my very personality.

Related: Why I Decided To Live In China For A Year

Defining the term “bilingual”

I use my “Second Language” when I am confused because I am trying to access a part of my identity that remains dormant throughout the majority of the day.

My frustrations with learning Chinese are the same ones that I feel with Español, but the ones with Español wound me more. I sometimes feel as if a stranger is living inside of me. A person I admire but, one with whom I can never share intimate thoughts. It’s like I am missing out on a part of reality — I am not experiencing all of the colors and sounds life has to offer.

I feel this same sense of disconnect with myself as I do with my family. When they speak Español I can listen but, I do not contribute. This scenario has played itself time and time again, and every time it happens while I am amongst the locals in China, I’m reminded of those moments.

Being bilingual has always been like having a present that I can’t open.

Whenever I hear or read Español, a spark ignites within me. I can feel a part of me pulling towards it, everything is recognizable and at the same time distant. My two identities — American and Latino — are not necessarily opposites of one another but, they nonetheless are struggling to form a bond.

It’s like having two brains, and one is always asleep. It wakes up in continuous waves, often hiding.

I no longer want my Español to be my “Second Language.” I want it to be on par with my proficiency in English. I don’t want there to be a first or second language; I want the ability to experience myself fully. I want to be able to think in two languages — to unlock the side of me that I’ve been yearning to meet.

Related: The Art Of Being A Polymath: Not Being Married To Your Ideas

The first step in creating my own “Tower of Babel”

My inspiration and motivation for developing a discipline of practicing my Español not only stems from my recent move to China. Ever since both of my maternal grandparents have passed away, I feel a sudden urgency to master this language. I want to do so to have a stronger bond with my family.

I want to master this language before I have the privilege of raising my own children. I wish to bestow upon them the ability to have two souls, to be able to speak more than one language. Have personalities grander and more elaborate than my own, compared to when I was a child.

Now that I’m an English teacher, I’m able to see why my student’s parents want them to learn a second language. It provides them with opportunities. I want the same for myself and my children.

The only way for me to really know if I’ve accomplished any growth in Español would be to help another person do the same.

Some techniques I’m currently using to help me start exercising this part of my brain are as follows:

  • I’m now watching anime, films, and old television shows in Español. I already know some of the plots, so it’s easy to solely focus on what’s being said. Additionally, I also put my subtitles in Español so that I can learn the proper grammar as well (the placement of acentos still alludes me).
  • I’m listening to a lot of music from Willie Colón, Héctor Lavoe, Mana, Juanes, Héctor Rey, Frank Reyes, Jerry Riveria, and more. Primarily, I’m listening to music I heard as a kid to tie back past experiences to new words. At the same time, I’m trying to dissect the meaning of the lyrics (las letras), more-so than merely trying to remember them. Doing this will help me to avoid translating the words I hear into English — I’m digesting them as they are. Finding the English translation of a word and el dificinion de la palabras en solamente Español are two entirely different things.
  • Trying to think in Español is the most laborious task of all. Thinking in Español requires a level of concentration I don’t currently have. I have to learn how to talk to myself, absorb my observations of the world, and analyze my reactions all with my other identity. For now, I’m working on at least talking to myself in the morning using the language.

Words have power, and I will try to expand my mental arsenal with these exercises.

Related: Perfect Practice Makes Perfect vs Practice Makes Perfect

This is bigger than just attempting to access another part of who I am

If I’m able to master this language I can then utilize it whenever I’m using the internet. The internet is an extension of the mind; we can learn whatever we want — from whomever we want — at any given time. Being able to utilize the power of search with another language will help me grow as an intellectual, providing me with new paradigms of thought and new perspectives on current paradigms I already know. Additionally, I will be able to advance myself professionally.

Being able to understand the global community will open myself up to new job opportunities, one of which is becoming an English teacher in a high school or college in South America.

If you’re bilingual, what do you do to practice your second language? How do you balance your use of each of them? What resources (books, websites, apps, etc.) do you leverage to advance your growth? I would love to hear from you so please write a comment below!

Thanks for your time. // Gracias por tú tiempo.

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Kenny Soto China

Days 3-9 – A Lot Has Happened, Living In China Isn’t Easy

Proper preparation prevents poor performance

I must admit that even with all the preparation I did before arriving in Beijing, I have found myself to be overwhelmed. This feeling tends to persist every day, mainly due to all the challenges I have faced.

I faced my first toilet challenge at a shopping mall, of all the places it could have happened. Even with the time I took beforehand on YouTube to research how the toilets are used here—I still forgot to carry toilet paper and hand sanitizer with me at all times. Traveling is comfortable with the internet but, only if you remember what you’ve learned. With that said, there are other subtle aspects of life in Beijing that I still have issues wrapping my head around.

This feels like 1984

Another part of China that I still need to get used to is the sheer amount of cameras that seem to be in every subway station and public vicinity. Even at my job, cameras are commonplace. The Chinese love to take photographs of foreigners (lǎowài/老外) whenever they can. We are an oddity to them, and the concept of privacy isn’t a thing here.

Cameras are used to deter crime (both violent and petty) and to maintain the public order and harmony that ensures a stable society. In one subway station alone, you can find over 40 cameras staring at you from all angles.

I feel as if I am living in Orwell’s nightmare. However, I am not as disturbed about this as I thought I would be. In any given room in the States, there are as many cameras as there are people. Perhaps China isn’t as different in this regard, maybe as time goes on our own concept of privacy will erode as well—we are already used to being tagged in photos on social media without our approval beforehand. In addition to that, we don’t really know how our data is being used to influence our lives (*cough cough* Cambridge Analytica).

Adaptation Comes In Many Forms

My ability to adapt quickly is undoubtedly being tested now. I recently purchased a new phone so that I could have access to cellular data while I’m here. However, I feel like a child with this new phone in my hand.

I have no idea how it works, not only because I’m used to Apple’s user interface—most of the apps on this phone are in Mandarin. Even with all of my language settings converted into English, some of the apps needed to live in China (Alipay, JinShiSong, Didi, Taobao, and Baidu) only have Mandarin or limited Pinyin text. I wish I had the foresight to unlock my iPhone before leaving the States so that I wouldn’t have this issue but, I guess this will help me pick up the language faster.

Another aspect of China I’m still getting used to is the nightlife. There are a large number of bars that cater to expats, and I’ve already learned how to purchase some beer (píjiǔ/啤酒), the hard part is getting used to all of the prostitutes who try to solicit my friends and me. They are incredibly pushy and even when you say “no thank you” or bùyào/不要 (which has become my favorite word since I’ve arrived, considering how many people try to sell me shit I don’t want), they still persist. They think that if you’re just drunk enough you’ll succumb to their pitches—even though the majority of prostitutes I’ve encountered both by my own experience and from stories my friends have told—are all in their 40s to mid-50s. I don’t see myself ever getting accustomed to this aspect of Beijing’s nightlife.

There’s An Economy Based On Illiteracy

Lastly, I was able to see the Great Wall Of China. The experience on the wall itself was terrific but, getting there was a hassle. My friends and I arrived by bus, and we ended up getting lost in a parking lot as soon as we got there. After that, we ended up walking past the main entrance twice. We kept going into a shopping area for tourists and those who have already completed their journey on the wall.

As we were walking, we ended up stumbling into a photo booth/ticket area. When we purchased our tickets, we believed we were being scammed because we were guided into another area to take photos. Since no one could speak English, we were under the assumption that we didn’t need to pay them for the pictures we took. If we had known how to say “no thank you” correctly or “what’s going on?”, we could have avoided the whole awkward moment in the first place.

What worries me is any future situation in which people actually have nefarious intentions. Will I be able to see what’s about to happen before it occurs? It’s a persistent fear that I have right now.

I guess I just have to get used to the fact that I am not as smart as I thought I was back home.

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Maktub - A Book And A Word That Changed My Life Kenny Soto

Maktub: A Book & A Word That Changed My Life

Maktub an Arabic word that stands for, it is written.

I first discovered this word when I read The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. To say that the moment I read this book was timely is an understatement.

I received the book at the very crux of discovering what I wanted to strive towards. I was a junior in college, going through the same struggle that all of us go through at the peak of our adolescence. This peak being the challenge of figuring out what I want to do with my life.

I was studying music theory at the time, struggling with the curriculum I was being taught. As I was lamenting over the daily experiences, a dear friend of mine told me I had to read this book. The main reason was that they cared for my sanity and knew that it would help me one thousand times more than it did her if I had read this book before graduating.

I read this book with no definitive expectations. I’m truly indebted to her for the lessons I learned from this reading this book. I don’t often read a book more than once, but with this one, in particular, I find that I always learn something new after each read.

A brief intro to Paulo’s masterpiece

The story is about a boy reaching adulthood in Egypt. The main character searches for a treasure he cannot find.

The main character ends up meeting many mentors that are wiser than him. Through his tutelage, he realizes that his mentors aren’t necessarily teaching him lessons he needs—he’s realizing through his own actions, what the main character already knows about himself.

The mentors teach him about the omens of the world—the daily opportunities and distractions that surround us on a daily basis.

The first mentor he encounters eventually tells him about a journey he must go on, a journey that the boy saw in a dream.

It’s important to learn the language of the world

The “language” or “Soul of the World” is mentioned several times in this book. The author uses this phrase as a central tool to explain how the protagonist is able to intuitively avoid conflict and seek out the opportunities before him. I believe that the language is a reference to our own intuition. Certain things cannot be learned by reading books, only life experience can teach us the most important lessons in life.

The protagonist is well read, having attended university before the journey in the plot even began. But he learns fairly quickly that cognitive ability shouldn’t be confused with maturity. Just because one could be “book smart” doesn’t necessarily ensure their success when faced with life’s many trials.

One of my favorite themes that is derived from the language of the world motif is that of attaining knowledge from oneself—without relying on academia. More importantly, the character’s ability to tune into this language of the world increases in potency as he as eventually begins to experience failures along the way. The failures he experiences help him train his intuition and powers of observation.

Challenges should be welcomed

The true test of one’s character doesn’t come from when he succeeds but, from how he reacts to failure. It’s also important to note that the ideal reaction to failure is the ability to step back and learn from it. The protagonist in the story finds himself consistently challenged when he begins his journey towards and through the deserts of Africa. Among his many trials, there was a specifically amusing one that struck a chord with me.

Without providing too many spoilers, someone who befriends the main character ends up lying to him. After this event occurs and the protagonist is fully aware of what has transpired, he begins to lament his situation. What he soon realizes is that even with all the time in the world, worrying really doesn’t benefit him at all. Instead of giving up and going back home, he finds a way to collect his thoughts and set a plan of attack moving forward.

Failure will always be a presence in our lives, and if we are attuned to that fact—the failures we experience will be more palatable (especially as we experience them in the moment). When we face our challenges head-on, even if we fail, the sheer fact that we took the time to at least try makes us better people. More importantly, when do this it also affects the people around us. One of my favorite quotes of the book is on page 150 when the Paulo Coelho writes, “That’s what alchemists do. They show that, when we strive to become better than we are, everything around us becomes better too.”

You are a part of a network of people and with that fact in mind, whenever you try to improve yourself you indirectly improve the network you are a part of as well. People learn not only through action, they also learn from observing others. When we take the initiative to deliberately put ourselves in uncomfortable situations we help expand our collective consciousness (the consciousness which we have within ourselves and that which we share with others).

Related: Failure Is Your Friend & You’re Going To Fail A Lot

No matter what happens, follow your personal legend

“No matter what he does, every person on earth plays a central role in the history of the world. And normally he doesn’t know it (page 158-9).”

Individuality is necessary as we grow if we forget what makes us who we are—if we do not assert ourselves against the world—we won’t be attuned to the opportunities that present themselves to us every day. Our lives are defined not only by the opportunities we take but, also by the opportunities we miss. As we navigate our careers and daily lives, it’s important to always remember what we are working towards.

Goal setting only works if you:

  1. Track your progress on a regular basis.
  2. Ensure that your goals prioritize maximizing happiness.

Optimal goal setting isn’t possible if we set our goals and dreams based on what others want from us—family, friends, or society. Furthermore focusing on what other people’s goals are (or personal legends as they are referred to in the book), is a trap. You should only measure your own progress and no one else’s. You’d be wasting valuable energy that could be used for planning and execution if you’re trying to juggle your attention between your life and someone else’s.

Paulo is an amazing writer and I’m sure that if you read this book, you’ll learn some of these lessons yourself and see some that I might have looked past.

If you do read this book, or already have, I’d love to hear from you. What did you learn while reading it? Is there anything I’ve written here that you don’t agree with? Let’s talk in the comments section below or send me a message!

Maktub my friends.

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Why I decided to live in china for a year kenny soto

Why I Decided To Live In China For A Year

“Anyone who stops learning is old.”

— Henry Ford

When I was in college, I ran errands on TaskRabbit to make some extra money. One day, a client of mine I was helping with housekeeping asked me to throw away all the books in his study, little did I know how pivotal that moment would be. While I was cleaning his apartment, I stumbled upon a bookmark.

On this bookmark would be the first word I would learn in Chinese: 和平, which means Peace. I carry it with me every day, ‘til this day, although it took me some time to figure out where the ideogram originated.

In hindsight, that moment set my life on a bold, new, and adventurous path–which now takes me to China to live for a year!

How I decided to do this

Picture this. You’re a recent college graduate. The world is your oyster. You immediately get a job right out of college and begin to learn how to navigate the professional world around you. You’re no longer a kid. People rely on you and expect great things from you. I ended up getting my dream job sooner than expected. Everything seemed to be falling into place. However, after some time I began to wonder what else might be out there for me. During a process of deep self-reflection, something came to mind. It was a nagging feeling that plagued me constantly.

I began questioning daily life:

  • How does one lay the foundation for a prosperous life?
  • What’s more important: job security or happiness?
  • What does it mean to have a job in the 21st Century?
  • How do I make sure my work is meaningful and has an impact?

The most important question was, “What more can I learn about the world?”

Looking back, there is a whole medley of reasons as to why I chose this for myself. The chief reason among them was that I don’t know what I want to do yet. I want to continue tasting new careers, gaining new skills, and learning more about different cultures.

I’m also, in a way, proving something to myself.

I’d like to know if my ability to dissect ideas and my ability teach can be improved. What better way to test that than in a new country–teaching kids. I have a strong feeling that if I can learn how to teach children, I’ll have a new set of skills for teaching other people in the future. Although, I am keeping myself open to the subjects I will teach.

I would also like to discover which aspects of my identity come from myself versus what comes from being American. My hope is that through this experience, I can discover more about myself as an individual.

I had two crucial conversations with both my mother and my mentor that helped to solidify my commitment to this decision. They are very supportive of my decision to travel the world and with their support, I decided that it wouldn’t hurt to at least apply to several English instructor positions in various countries. Fortunately for me, I was hired by a Chinese company to teach 3 to 5 year olds English in Beijing.

Connecting more to my roots

China Fam 1

Another reason why I feel so inclined to do this is that my parents have a skill that I don’t have. They know how to live in another country. It’s something I admire about them, the ability to chart a new path in a place entirely foreign to them. I believe that if I take it upon myself to go through a similar experience, I’ll not only become a better person—I’ll also understand them better too. Learning more about our family history first hand, in my own way is a big incentive for me to leave America. Seeking a more intimate relationship with my family’s past is another reason why I’m doing this.

Additionally, if I ever have the privilege to have children, I would like to be able to give them advice based on my experience.  Recommending to them, the experience of traveling the world will have more of an impact if I’ve done it myself. Lastly, I know that through this experience I will learn more about myself. I don’t want to limit the experience of my life just solely to being a New Yorker; I want to acquire knowledge that can help me in any part of the world. For me to do that, I have to leave my comfort zone.

China Fam 2

China Fam 3

How my mentor was a big source of inspiration

Maurice B Canton 1979

Photo of Maurice Bretzfield, Canton (Guangzhou) China, October 1978

My mentor Maurice has influenced me greatly in committing to this decision. A man who has visited more than 50 countries, I feel indebted to him for all that he’s taught me these past three years. However, I feel that the lessons he’s provided me won’t truly resonate until I have a similar life experience that he’s had. Hearing his stories of being 24 and traveling to South Korea for the first time, and then setting up shop in China during the eighties makes me somewhat envious. I’m deciding to act upon that envy and use it as a tool to create my own stories of adventure.

In addition to his inspirational stories, my mentor Maurice has a ton of friends who also traveled the world when they were young. Hearing their stories of what they discovered about the world and themselves also sparked my curiosity in doing this for myself. Considering all of them are successful business owners and entrepreneurs, there is definitely a connection between their success and traveling.

Lastly, I do want to beat my mentor’s “high score.” I mean, being able to say that I’ve visited more than 50 countries is something I’d like to brag about in the future.

What I plan on doing there

While I’m in China, I’ll be working as an English instructor. In my spare time, I plan on absorbing as much as I can about the culture, their technological advancements, and most importantly—the food. I find that this experience may not necessarily connect to some big vision, nor does it need to. But I know that it is necessary for my overall growth as a person. I’m currently in a place in my life of “not knowing what’s next.” I can take risks. And understanding that I will never be 100% ready, I just have to try and see what happens.

Besides, if I don’t do this now, when will I?

With all this being said, if you have any recommendations for sights to see, food to eat, experiences to have while I’m in China—please send them my way!

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Failure is your friend Kenny Soto

Failure Is Your Friend & You’re Going To Fail A Lot

“Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm.” — Winston Churchill

Have you ever experienced an awkward moment when you made a mistake in front of someone? The shame that’s felt when caught making an avoidable mistake, making you feel miserable? Predicting the wrong outcome and suffering the consequences that came from overconfidence and poor planning? Failure is a fact of life. We periodically learn more from the avoidance of repeated failures than we do from chasing continued success.

Below is a recent reflection I wrote about failure. I wrote this as a resource for myself and my hope is that from reading this, some part will resonate with you as well and provide you with a new approach to positively reacting and reflecting on your own failures.

Failure is always a possibility

When I think about the word failure, I get a mixed reaction of disdain and of acceptance. Disdain towards the memories of past failures I have made and acceptance of the fact that failure will always be a constant factor in anything I try to do. Mistakes, pain, rejection — all of these are prerequisites for success.

Failure is as much a prerequisite for success as it is the opposite of success, for we cannot succeed without failing first. One could challenge this claim by stating that they have succeeded in accomplishing tasks and feats at the first attempt. However, that rebuttal tends to beg the question, “Can you understand how you achieved that initial success?” See, even if you succeed at something within the first attempt, that doesn’t necessarily mean you can replicate that same outcome unless you have a fundamental understanding of how it came to be. Failure is what teaches us how to achieve success that can be done more than once. Failure provides us the understanding needed for repeated success when it matters most.

Related: The Art Of Being A Polymath: Not Being Married To Your Ideas

It’s nothing personal

It should be mentioned that I personally have difficulty remembering this paradigm shift whenever I experience a failure in real-time. I, like many others, tend to be awash with that feeling of disdain I mentioned above. “Why is this happening to me?” “What did I do wrong?” “Life isn’t fair.” However, thinking about failure with respect to it being a part of what success is, it has in a way helped in my reflections on past mistakes and mishaps I’ve had in the past. I don’t often times think about this during the incident but, it does allow for me to cope and move on more effectively.

Consider for example the world of sales. Success in selling anything, whether it be a product or service isn’t determined by the number of yes’s you get, rather by the number of no’s! It’s a necessary step in learning from every moment and to see your failures as building blocks, not roadblocks.

“As we try to create favorable outcomes from the decisions we make, we can also try to create desirable failures.”

Don’t make your failures personal. As Les Brown once famously said“When things go wrong, don’t go with them.” His words align with the notion that the failures in our lives can bring us both valuable lessons and even happiness as a consequence of letting the past be used as a tool for growth and learning. It is when we see the past failures we made as grandiose incidents rather than what they really are, we get in our own way.

Ryan Holiday, author of the book Ego Is The Enemyprovides insight into the dangers of letting failure (and success) get to our heads. Just as it is important to accept the failures in our lives and move on, it is just as important to constantly and objectively evaluate who are. In this evaluation, you have to consider your ability in the moment in which you tackled the situations in when you failed and review why you may have been the only cause of said failure.

For a moment, reflect on this passage from Ego Is The Enemy:

“One might say that the ability to evaluate one’s own ability is the most important skill of all. Without it, improvement is impossible. And certainly ego makes it difficult every step of the way. It is certainly more pleasurable to focus on our talents and strengths, but where does that get us? Arrogance and self-absorption inhibit growth. So does fantasy and ‘vision’ (page 21).”

Your approach to failure has to be grounded in reality. When I think about the commonalities between all of the failures I’ve had in the past (and the ones that will definitely happen in the future) the common thread is that I reacted poorly in the moment because I was too focused on myself. With this new approach to thinking about failures as building blocks moving forward, I’m going to shift the common thread of my failures to be, “a moment in time in which I learned something new and had fun while learning it.”

Related: Perfect Practice Makes Perfect vs Practice Makes Perfect

Gamify your daily challenges

Games and game theory can be used to further think about the topic of failure as a tool, as a positive fact of life. Consider this: one of the best ways to approach the daily challenges we face is by thinking of them as games. If we to take this into consideration as we go throughout life, we could come to not only accept the inevitability of failure but, also begin to appreciate our reactions towards it. In games, if you play enough times you’re bound to lose.

With this in mind, if we can predict our failures in advance, perhaps we can even help skew the results of the decisions we make in our favor. As we try to create favorable outcomes from the decisions we make, we can also try to create desirable failures. We can skew even the most unfortunate of events into integral components for our growth. By considering what are the desirable outcomes of any scenario (both in success and in failure) we can not only plan to succeed but, also prepare to learn from our future mistakes.

Depending on the nature of your work, there are certain mistakes that are permissible (especially if you are just at the start of your job). Think about the acceptable loses your team is willing to endure on your behalf. In addition, consider what are acceptable loses you permit yourself to make. Have you thought of any? Failures are bound to happen and the inability to forgive oneself doesn’t allow for growth and progress.

In games, my general approach is to learn how to have fun first, which in turn relieves some of the pressure and stress that comes from competition and loss. When the focus is shifted from winning to just learning the mechanics of the game itself and making the experience enjoyable — there is no way that failure can distract or deter one from moving forward. And as we fail, we will begin to gain insights that will help us to not repeat the same mistakes in the future.

Related: 6 Lessons For My Career That I’ve Learned From Being A Gamer

Accepting failure as a part of growth

Tying back to seeing acceptable failures as a part of your list of desired outcomes, you can also leverage practical pessimism when reflecting on your failures. Practical pessimism is a mode of thinking, in which the focus is to catalyze effective productivity even if failure is imminent. It is a way of stoically approaching the world, although you may fail — the pain of said failure isn’t as bad as you may believe.

Taking into account whatever your failures may be, if you go face your challenges with the primed reaction of, “I accept that this is just a small moment of my life, one that I will learn from,” you can always gain something from any failure that may occur.

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What Will You Do To "Flip" Your Time Kenny Soto

What Will You Do To “Flip” Your Time?

The Formula

Your time equals = Building relationships + Supporting good habits + Ongoing education + Vision + Fun

 

We all have only 168 hours every week. Excluding the time we allocate for sleeping, eating, and preparing for the day, we don’t have enough time to work on our goals. The majority of time is spent at work or school (depending on your age). Are we maximizing every day we get? How are we ensuring that is actually true? Below is an update to an article I previously wrote on time management for millennials. You can read that article here.

Building for your future self

At the start of our careers, we can often lose track on how we are positioning ourselves for success. Seeking accolades and approval from the people we work with tends to be the main focus for recent college graduates and young professionals and although those are necessary requirements for upward mobility, they aren’t the only aspects of our careers that matter. Another part of setting ourselves up for success revolves around continuous education, adopting healthy habits, and skills acquisition.

Setting up “learning goals” on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis is a great way for tracking your professional progress over time. To make your system of tracking success even more refined, create a log of the mistakes you make alongside your learning goals. Being able to objectively track your results over time (good and bad) will help you see what areas of your work need more attention. The best way to implement any changes you see fit is to consider how you would like to “build” upon your future-self. Are you asking yourself the right questions before seeking new knowledge? This a foundational question to ask yourself as you begin to create your own curriculum after college and beyond.

Related: What Questions Are We Asking Ourselves?

Auditing your habits: Calendars, Mentors, and Peers

Another way to track your progress is by using your calendar. It may seem like a simple tool when trying to improve upon who you are as a person but, I’ve found my calendar to be invaluable.

My calendar is where I can visually see the following:

  • My current learning goals
  • Mistakes I’ve logged
  • Daily appointments and meetings segmented by color/priority

Having a visual representation for what you need to accomplish can help hold yourself accountable.

In addition to using your calendar, having a mentor can also help in being held accountable to what you add to your calendar—if the guilt of not following it isn’t enough to spur the enthusiasm needed for you to get stuff done. A mentor can help you design the fastest way to learn. When you have access to a mentor, you learn from mistakes that you don’t need to make yourself.

An alternative to finding a mentor who can help teach you and objectively track your progress can be having weekly calls with a peer. During these weekly calls both of you can discuss the following:

  • Goals you have for the following week
  • Things you’ve accomplished
  • Mistakes you’ve made
  • What you’ve learned from them
  • Ideas for improvement

When I have these calls with a friend of mine from college, they usually last 10-15 minutes. It helps as an investment in yourself and your network, depending on how many of these calls you would like to have. In the event you don’t feel like you have anything to talk about during the call or if you quickly go over your agenda, here’s another prompt for conversation: “What questions did you ask today?” Asking this will always lead fruitful introspective thought for both parties.

If you don’t a mentor you can reach out to right now, you can always find them in books. One book in particular that I recommend is, “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change” by Jim Collins. He defines a simple system for considering which essential habits are needed for your success and improving your progress over time. All of the suggestions mentioned in this book are practical and can be immediately implemented (the main challenge will be staying consistent in following what he recommends).

“A mentor can help you design the fastest way to learn.” — Kenny Soto #TweetThis

Related: What Could You Do If You Had A Second Brain?

Every notification is a request for your time

Do you get a return on investment for every minute you spend looking at a screen? Are all notifications created equal? How is your phone aiding you? Are you using it to help control your agenda?

Another distraction that deters us from concentrating on our everyday tasks and learning goals is the need to view and respond to every push notification that comes our way. Learning how to say “no” to the online communities we are a part of is key to making sure we are focused and not looking at our screens. The notifications will stay in your app; you don’t need them intruding on what you need to get done in the moment. Managing your time means managing your content consumption. The content you want to see and people you want attention from aren’t going anywhere.

Try turning off the notifications for all of your social media applications and setting aside time in your schedule to check up on what’s going on. No one will notice that you aren’t responding or posting, especially if you aren’t building a brand online and you’re just using it to stay connected with family and friends. 

 

The most important thing to remember is that none of these recommendations work unless you put them into action, and you must always be honest with yourself. Books may not help, a calendar may not be completely effective, nor will a mentor/partner that holds you accountable. But you need to try them to see what works in the context of your own reality. And also, know that if you’re able to manage your time for work, you’ll have time set aside for fun. “Flipping” your time means finding ways to use it more effectively. What will do to make sure that is happening every day?

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Your kids will google you Kenny Soto

Your Children Will Google You, You’re A Living Time Capsule

Do you need a personal brand?

“When’s the last time you’ve Googled your name?” This is a question I often ask college students who want to know why I work in personal branding. Common questions I get are: What’s the point? Isn’t that just for celebrities and public figures? How can personal branding benefit me, no one else in my career is focused on building one?

It used to be that only celebrities need to focus on this, but now we all need to be our own publicists because we all create content about our lives on a daily basis. The cool part is that we have complete control over the narratives that we create. But with that complete control comes the responsibility to understand the longterm consequences of our digital content creation.

As I’ve had conversations about this new social landscape, I still meet resistance and hesitation by some people on getting started. So now I have a new reason as to why it’s important to start your personal branding strategy now: your children will google you in the future.

What if they could learn alongside you?

One of the many benefits of personal branding is that you get to create the narrative of your life, one that you want to be known for. However, the majority of our social interactions and publishing online is usually unconscious. Each post we publish and interact with is archived, helping us grow our digital presence over time. Whether it is through written, visual, audio or a combination of all three—we can strategically create content that showcases the lessons we are learning over time.

With this in mind, we can use our daily lives as a resource for our future offspring, providing them with essential lessons within the context of who we are. At the same time, there is an added benefit because in any event they don’t necessarily want to grasp a lesson you give them at the time that you mention it, it will still be available online for years to come. If you believe that they won’t research anything about your life in the future, just audit how you interact with people you’ve recently met. You find them on the social media accounts they have and research their past posts to see what they are about. Your kids will have the ability to do the same thing and whether or not they take action in researching your past—you want to be prepared.

Related: What Could You Do If You Had A Second Brain?

Your content tells a story, here’s how to start

The content you create today will also be a part of your legacy. Once you pass on, the digital presence you cultivated over the years will be used as a resource for your kids and grandkids to help remember who you were. You can use this to your advantage. Technology (especially social media) exposes the world to the core of who we are as individuals. This fact will inevitably make all of us (or at least those who are conscious of the fact that our lives are being documented) into better people. That simple realization can help us as a platform for creating content we can share with our progeny. This can be a foundation for your approach to personal branding and content creation.

The easiest way to begin creating content is by asking yourself: “What questions do I currently have?” After asking yourself this, do some research online or ask people you know who are knowledgeable in the targeted subject matter for their answers. If you find the answers you seek, you can use that as content. If you don’t, you can create your own answer and publish it yourself.

You can also document what is going in your life on a frequent basis, as mentioned above. What may be boring or insignificant to you may be extremely valuable for your viewers so, don’t worry about being boring or seeking perfection with your content. You’re not the judge of your content, your audience is. And if you believe you don’t have an audience yet, then imagine that your future kids are that audience.

Related: What Questions Are We Asking Ourselves?

You can provide an example of how your kids should begin personal branding

Kids today are using cell phones as early as 10 years old. With that fact in mind, it is more than likely that your kids (or future kids) will be using technology and social media at an early age too. How will you prepare them for their digital lives? If you begin creating a personal brand now, the habits and best practices you discover can then be passed down to them.

The best way to learn anything is through imitation and if your kids and grandkids have a good role model helping them understand the benefits of strategic storytelling online (and all the other life-lessons you’re providing through your content), it could give them a head start in their ability to create the careers and lives they want.

 

These are just some personal musing to think about if you’ve ever wondered if personal branding and content creation is right for you.

I’d love to get your thoughts on this. How is this new ability to document our lives affected you? Do you feel like there are other reasons to start personal branding that aren’t mentioned here? Comment below and let’s chat!

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6 Lessons For My Career That I've Learned From Being A Gamer Kenny Soto

6 Lessons For My Career That I’ve Learned From Being A Gamer

This article was written with contributions from Malik Christopher.

Video games are more than entertainment

It’s been over six months since I’ve found the time to play video games. I used to be obsessed, sometimes playing until 2:00 AM on weekdays. I find it hard to believe that I’ve entered a stage in my life where games are slowly leaving my schedule. As I reflect on the lessons I’ve learned from playing them, perhaps one of these will resonate with you too.

No matter what you do to level up, books are your best friend

Taking a page (pun intended) out of The Elder Scrolls: SKYRIM, one of the most important lessons I’ve gained was learning how to level up faster by using books found throughout the world. In the game, there are various skills that you level up to create a fully customized character. An easy way to level up a skill tree is by finding the hidden books across the land. When you acquire a book, your character automatically goes to the next level of that related skill.

The importance of this is that even in video games, education is stressed. Learning how you learn and setting up a way to control your education so that you can level up your skills will always be relevant.

Related: Creating Your Own Curriculum For Self-Education After College

When you accept too many side-missions, you can get off track

Among other challenges, time management in games is critical to your success. Now, gamers define success differently when it comes to specific games. Not all games have an end point, one can play an open world/sandbox game such as Grand Theft Auto and never progress through the main narrative. Time management in video games is important because it determines how fast you beat the game, what achievements or trophies you want to acquire, and how much can you brag to your other friends who play the game. Also, there’s the conundrum of having to decide how to split your time up if you want to play online or not.

The challenge of time management and the lessons I started to gather myself, became readily apparent when I encountered the particular issue of having to play games that have endless side quests & missions. Open world (or sandbox) games are distinct in that they allow the player to step outside of the main story and interact with the world freely. As players, we have the control to do whatever we want for hours on end. The benefit of doing side-missions is that the player gets rewarded with bonus content, prizes, and they most likely help to create a richer gaming experience.

What I took away from playing side missions specifically from Grand Theft Auto is that there are both pros and cons. The negative aspect of side missions is that they can pile on if you’re not too careful and if you’re like me, you get frustrated because one of your main goals is to complete the game. This observation has prompted me to think about the number of projects I take on in real life and how I decide which ones are worth my time. Sure, there could be some list of benefits for taking on new projects, but one must ask themselves, “Does this take away from my primary objectives?” In addition to time management, video games certainly help with creating better decision-making skills if you’re consciously auditing what you do while playing.

Don’t chase money, chase skills

There are video games designed to let the player win if there is certain amount cash to acquire as the main objective. However, most of the games I’ve played require you to focus on your character’s base attributes or if you’re playing online — you need to incorporate talent and skills to be the best. There tends to be a currency system in most role-playing games as an example, but the goal isn’t only to acquire virtual wealth.

Putting a focus on actually developing your character so that they strike terror in the face of the enemy is usually your best bet. This maps on well to life in general. Often, we think about gathering short term gains. Even if it’s relatively short in real life, there is still a considerable amount of time that one has to commit to growing your character’s skills. The skills are what make the game easier, even if you have the best “gear” or items Having a character with a skillset that allows you to adapt to any scenario is what actually matters. It’s the same with who you are in your life. Skills acquisition will always be more important than money.

Related: Accelerating Your Professional Growth By Working For Free

There are no cheat codes in life

If there is one thing that I’ve noticed for both video games and my personal life is that: I’m usually heading in the right direction if things start getting harder. Especially if I start getting more haters/enemies over time. There’s a natural progression in video games, as your character grows in power and skill, so do the enemies you encounter. Life is the same, and if you try to circumvent that by thinking you can game the system, you’re sadly mistaken. Using “cheat codes” in videos games makes them boring over time. When you do it in real life, it can damage your reputation and hurt you in the long term (even if there are short-term benefits).

An example of a cheat code in real life is lying on your resume. Sure it’s a faster way for you to get your foot in the door but, you will be found out eventually. No one ever got bragging rights by using cheat codes to beat a hard game. You only get the right to be proud of yourself when you tackle your challenges head on and when you’re patient with your growth.

There will always be someone better than you

Lastly, the most important lesson I’ve ever gained from video games (specifically playing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3), is that there will always be someone better than you. This isn’t to say that you shouldn’t consistently try to be the best at what you do, more so that you should be aware that surrounding yourself with people that are more knowledgeable and skilled than you is more than ok — it’s essential to your personal and professional growth.

There is no way you can grow to your fullest potential in whatever you decide to do in life if you don’t have other people to put your current skillset into perspective. I personally want to be a great blogger, so I’m constantly comparing myself to others at the top (like Seth Godin). Not out of envy, but out of admiration and for study. I’m a big believer that imitation is one easy way to test new things and see what’s successful.

Being beaten by people better than you is how you learn how to play the game. It’s how you get better, especially if the competition is significantly past you in years of experience. And most importantly, it keeps things enjoyable. Because who wants to have a boring experience playing video games let alone in life? Competition breeds growth and constant challenges.

Playing with a team is the “name of the game”

In competitive games such as League of Legends or Overwatch, each member of your team is assigned a certain role that has specific objectives that they need to be accomplished during every match. When a mistake is made in one of these roles, whether big or small, it becomes detrimental to the entire team with the potential losing the match. It isn’t as costly if one plays on their own (casual gamers do this), but in the professional atmosphere (eSports) such as the Championship Series for League of Legends, a prize pool of millions of in-game dollars have easily been taken out of a team’s reach because of one mistake.

A chain is only as strong as its weakest link”, rings true in situations like these. If one person falls behind, you’ll easily be outclassed by a team that’s more on top of things. What usually follows is frustration, blame, and a decrease in skill overall. The ability to help those you work with by providing constructive criticism is crucial. A concern for their weaknesses, should be tackled with the appropriate feedback. Slowly, you’ll notice not only improvement in them, but also in yourself as a leader and team player. And in the professional world, we all work in teams.

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Working for free kenny soto

Accelerating Your Professional Growth By Working For Free

Working for free has its own value

Since 2015 I’ve been volunteering my time at SCORE NYC, a federal nonprofit that helps small business owners with free & confidential business advice. Through my two years of experience volunteering my marketing services, I’ve begun to see the value in working for free.

As I reflect on the lessons gathered from my experience, I invite you to consider finding ways to give back to your community. Hopefully, this article will convince you that it’s worth your time.

 

Working for free helps you learn faster

Ever since I’ve graduated college, I’ve been obsessed with self-education. How do I take control of my professional growth? How do I increase my value to the people I currently work with and those who I will work with in the future? How do I fan flames of my curiosity on a consistent basis? These questions have plagued me for quite some time now, and I’ve begun to realize that through my volunteer experience, I’ve been able to find suitable answers.

Professional growth (as far as my limited perspective allows me to define it) is the rate at which your acquire new skills and knowledge that brings credibility to your personal brand. We all have a personal brand associated with us, and we have to find a balance with both promotion and actually creating value for others. I find that my professional growth continues to accelerate because I work for free.

It’s easier for me to put myself in situations that challenge me because the cost of investing in me is just the other person’s time. Because I’m not charging anyone for my services, I can experiment more and find new ways of approaching my craft. This is allowing me to build a body of work that I wouldn’t have been able to do otherwise. Also, by consistently practicing my craft, I am finding ways to expand on ideas that I learn through reading, podcasts, and video. The best way to learn something is ultimately by doing it.

Related: Creating Your Own Curriculum For Self-Education After College

 

If you work for free, you’ll realize if the work actually makes you happy

I’m sure I’m not the only one who has a fear of working in a job that doesn’t bring enthusiasm and more importantly, brings forth curiosity every day. To be great in our work, we must first start off with making sure we’re happy while doing it.

Is the grind worth it? I believe this answer can come to you faster if you give yourself some time to do the work for free (with the ultimate goal being that you eventually get paid for the value you provide).

I run the digital marketing program for SCORE NYC, primarily because it allows me to truly know if I want to do marketing in the future. If I don’t enjoy doing this now, how can I possibly enjoy it later? As time goes on, my learning curve in this subject will begin to plateau, and I will need to put in even more effort to continue. It’s important for me to know if I want to invest a decade doing this, before I actually do so. I believe that volunteering your services for a year can help all of us in the process of finding what we love to do.

Worst case scenario, working for free allows you to taste a lot of things. It gives you the opportunity to see where your talents lie and remove the illusions you may have about your skill set.

 

Working for free helps you build your network (faster)

Another great perk of volunteering your time is that your list of contacts grows at a faster rate than if you were to charge for your services (or just relying on your 9-to-5). I’ve become a big believer of delaying gratification if it leads to more significant gains in the future. However, even if you’re not getting paid with money, you can still find ways to bring value to yourself, both in education (as previously mentioned above) and in meeting people you wouldn’t have met otherwise.

The barrier of entry is met with less resistance and friction from others when you are providing your services for free. People will be more receptive to what you have to say and contribute because they will be judging your value based on your commitment to helping them. Of course, price does play a factor on judging someone’s skill but, as a young professional, I find it appropriate not to have a price for my services right now.

It’s a means to end if I can meet people that will help me 5, 10, even 15 years from now. Just keep in mind, you still have to be good at what you do to maximize the value that can be extracted from your interactions and your growing network. You can certainly volunteer your time but, people will discontinue your working relationship with you if you are wasting their time and can’t bring results.

Related: The Best Networking Tip For Young Professionals: Host An Event

 

Doing the right thing always pays off

I understand that working for free isn’t always practical. We all have obligations and responsibilities that must be met. However, if you can’t volunteer your time now, try to make an effort to do so in the future.

Giving back to your community has many benefits, but the ultimate one is the gratification that comes from helping people. At the end of the day, no matter the industry and the role you play in the teams you are involved in, the exchange of value will always be prevalent. There’s just a distinct sense of gratitude you find from someone you helped out of the kindness of your heart says thank you, as opposed to it coming after the exchange of money.

Again, I’m not saying that working to get paid is a bad thing. Just consider adding some time to volunteer into your schedule. I can guarantee that you’ll gain something from the experience.

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